Introduction

In today’s world, we’re seeing more and more enterprises launching zero trust networks. These are networks where users, devices, and applications within the network should not be trusted. Zero trust is an important part of your overall security strategy because it allows you to deploy resources in a much more effective way than traditional approaches allow for. If you have an interest in deploying a zero trust network architecture in your organization but aren’t quite sure where to start, this article will help lay out some key steps for getting started with deploying zero trust.

What is zero trust?

Zero trust is a new way to secure enterprise data. It is a security perimeter that is both dynamic and contextual, based on identity, which assumes that all users, devices, and applications within the network should not be trusted. A zero trust network architecture consists of two parts:

  • User context – This refers to identifying the user and their location through an authentication process when they attempt to access corporate resources from anywhere in the world.
  • Device context – This refers to authenticating devices before allowing them access to enterprise resources by verifying the device itself against an authorized list of approved devices (for example those owned by employees).

How it secures enterprise data

Zero trust network architecture is a security perimeter that is both dynamic and contextual, while being based on identity. A zero trust network assumes that all users, devices, and applications within the network should not be trusted.

How to deploy zero trust network architecture

  • Integrate identity and access management with network security.
  • Install network access control.
  • Use role-based access control.
  • Use multi-factor authentication (MFA).
  • Use data loss prevention (DLP) to protect sensitive information within your organization’s systems and applications, such as email or file servers; this can be accomplished by creating policies that restrict the use of certain types of files on the system, or by creating rules that prohibit sending certain types of emails containing sensitive information (e.g., Social Security numbers).

The zero trust approach is a security perimeter that is both dynamic and contextual, while being based on identity. A zero trust network assumes that all users, devices, and applications within the network should not be trusted.

The zero trust approach is a security perimeter that is both dynamic and contextual, while being based on identity. A zero trust network assumes that all users, devices, and applications within the network should not be trusted.

As such, you need to have an additional layer of protection against attacks or unauthorized access to your data. This means that you need to know who is accessing your resources at any given time and ensure that only those people are able to do so.

Conclusion

The zero trust approach is a security perimeter that is both dynamic and contextual, while being based on identity. A zero trust network assumes that all users, devices, and applications within the network should not be trusted unless they have been explicitly authorized. With zero trust architecture, organizations can protect their assets while enabling employees to do their jobs more effectively.